Why Friday is Good

  Why Friday is Good An essay submission by Abigail Page, NYU ’18 A crown of thorns encircles his head. A tear slides down his cheek. His eyes look not above, not below, but straight at me, piercing my soul. The picture is graphic, but somehow it is still beautiful. It is Good Friday, the day symbolizing the death of Jesus in the Christian religion, and I’m watching a slideshow in the darkened church before the service officially begins. Years ago, I never would have pictured myself crying in a place as sheltered and secure as Saint Paul’s Episcopal Church. My mother and father met within the well worn walls of Saint Paul’s over half a century ago, when their parents dutifully brought them to Sunday School each week. Not only did they find their faith within the church, but they found each other. Naturally, when I was born, I was immediately taken to Saint Paul’s for a blessing. Church for me, more than anything else, represents family as well as my connection to it. Saint Paul’s was and is my second home; I met some of my best friends there, I learned the virtues of tolerance and acceptance, and I matured surrounded by a community made up of truly good people. All of my memories here are happy ones, so why do I feel overwhelmed by such a simple service? Once the slideshow is finished, I wipe my eyes and take my position behind the podium, which has been covered in black for mourning purposes, where a microphone waits. A few other parishioners and I will be reading a re­enactment of the crucifixion. I, who have always striven to win the theoretical “most involved’ superlative within Saint Paul’s, will be playing Jesus. I think back to a time when things were much more simple, when all that mattered was the children’s Christmas Eve pageant. The first time I was involved in the Nativity, I played an angel, and a sweet little angel I was. However, after the pageant, I told my mother that while I was happy to be an angel, I wanted to be God next time. This memory is not one I can allude to directly. That is to say, I don’t exactly remember it. I only know that my dear, late grandmother used to tell this story every Christmas along with a good natured chuckle and a sparkle in her eye. I can’t precisely recall why I was so intent on “Playing God,” though. Perhaps it was just one of the adorably simple­minded things that kids just so happen to say. Maybe I merely desired to be paid attention to based upon what I considered to be my flawless acting skills. Then again, it could have been something more. I’m almost positive that I wanted to play God in order to assert myself as a child well learned in the thoughts, beliefs, and ideals of the Page, Mansfield, and Earley families. It must have been that I wanted to impress them, to prove myself in the competitive world that was my family. Even during Sunday School classes, my cousin and I would race to see who raised his or her hand first, who received the best compliment from the teacher ­ although this was sometimes irrelevant due to the fact that sometimes the role of Sunday School teacher was…